The Wireworld computer in Java

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The Wireworld computer in Java

Here’s the computer running. If you don’t see anything happening, you may need to enable Java in your browser. The computer’s display should show ‘00003’; after a while (depending on the speed of your computer, it could easily be half an hour), the display will briefly change ‘00000’ and then to ‘00005’. If you enjoy sitting in front of little flickery lights, you could watch it until it gets to ‘00007’ or even ‘00011’.

I am no Java guru, so reports of success or failure at running this demonstration using Java implementations on various browsers are welcomed. An indication of how fast it runs for you would also be helpful: any, or, ideally, all of the following information is useful to me.

  • what browser/JVM combination you are using;
  • roughly how fast it runs in generations per second - it takes 96 generations for the electron to complete one circuit of the little isolated horizontal loop about three-quarters of the way down on the right-hand side, so you can use that for timing estimation purposes;
  • the clock speed of your machine.

Many thanks for your help.

Return to the Wireworld computer index.


This page most recently updated Fri 4 Feb 16:49:55 GMT 2022
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